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Choosing the Right Ceiling Fan

Choosing the Right Ceiling Fan

In the winter we rely on our furnaces and fireplaces.  During the summer, air conditioning takes the brunt of hot days.  But when it comes to mildly chilly or temperate days, we should be looking to ceiling fans.  Rather than spending energy on climate control, a ceiling fan can help regulate the warmth that already exists in a home.  The function of a ceiling fan is to keep air circulating in a room.  By reversing the direction of the fan’s spin, you’ll move warm air which has risen to the ceiling back towards the floor.  During periods where the weather outside is only a little chilly, a reversed ceiling fan and a sweater can keep you comfortably warm.

When Buying a Ceiling Fan, Consider This:

Getting a fan installed is simple and easy, but if you want the best balance of economy and efficiency, take a few minutes to figure out what you want from your fan.  Blade angle and number have an importance beyond aesthetics and style.  So here are a few things to consider first.

How high is your ceiling? You want at least 7 feet of clearance from the lowest point on your fan to the floor.  But the blades themselves should be no further than 10 feet from the floor.  When purchasing a fan, make sure that you have enough clearance and buy a downrod to help adjust the height.

Do you want quiet or power? The number of blades on your fan will affect its performance.  A large number of long blades will give you a very quiet fan, but the amount of air movement will be reduced.  Drag from the increased number of blades slows down the motor movement but gives you a balanced, quieter rotation.  This is why most fans for homes are shipped with 4-5 blades.  For quieter fans, use the 5-blade variant.

AC or DC Motors? Originally, most fans sported an AC motor that plugged directly into house current.  Newer models are being released with special DC motors.  They’re a little more complicated to install and slightly more expensive; however, DC motor fans are more energy efficient and will help you save money.

Using a ceiling fan when the weather is mild outside is highly beneficial to your home’s central heating and cooling.  For one thing, it reduces strain on the system, as it isn’t running year-round.  But ceiling fans also reduce the amount of energy you use so that you aren’t burning fuel or using electricity every month out of the year.  One or two ceiling fans in key areas of your home can be a great way to save money and stay comfortable.

Choosing the Right Ceiling Fan

In the winter we rely on our furnaces and fireplaces.  During the summer, air conditioning takes the brunt of hot days.  But when it comes to mildly chilly or temperate days, we should be looking to ceiling fans.  Rather than spending energy on climate control, a ceiling fan can help regulate the warmth that already exists in a home.  The function of a ceiling fan is to keep air circulating in a room.  By reversing the direction of the fan’s spin, you’ll move warm air which has risen to the ceiling back towards the floor.  During periods where the weather outside is only a little chilly, a reversed ceiling fan and a sweater can keep you comfortably warm.

When Buying a Ceiling Fan, Consider This:

Getting a fan installed is simple and easy, but if you want the best balance of economy and efficiency, take a few minutes to figure out what you want from your fan.  Blade angle and number have an importance beyond aesthetics and style.  So here are a few things to consider first.

How high is your ceiling? You want at least 7 feet of clearance from the lowest point on your fan to the floor.  But the blades themselves should be no further than 10 feet from the floor.  When purchasing a fan, make sure that you have enough clearance and buy a downrod to help adjust the height.

Do you want quiet or power? The number of blades on your fan will affect its performance.  A large number of long blades will give you a very quiet fan, but the amount of air movement will be reduced.  Drag from the increased number of blades slows down the motor movement but gives you a balanced, quieter rotation.  This is why most fans for homes are shipped with 4-5 blades.  For quieter fans, use the 5-blade variant.

AC or DC Motors? Originally, most fans sported an AC motor that plugged directly into house current.  Newer models are being released with special DC motors.  They’re a little more complicated to install and slightly more expensive; however, DC motor fans are more energy efficient and will help you save money.

Using a ceiling fan when the weather is mild outside is highly beneficial to your home’s central heating and cooling.  For one thing, it reduces strain on the system, as it isn’t running year-round.  But ceiling fans also reduce the amount of energy you use so that you aren’t burning fuel or using electricity every month out of the year.  One or two ceiling fans in key areas of your home can be a great way to save money and stay comfortable.

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