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My Air Conditioner Is Leaking Water: Why It’s Leaking and What to Do

Wall with mold stain due to air conditioner leakage, close up. Mildew destroys the wall.

The hot months of a Northern California summer mean that your air conditioner is likely working overtime.

If your air conditioner is leaking water, you may wonder why that’s happening and what you can do about it.

Read on to discover a few reasons why you may be dealing with an AC leaking and steps you can take to correct the issue.

How and Why Water Forms in Your Air Conditioner

Most modern air conditioning systems contain an indoor and outdoor unit. An evaporator coil is contained in the inside unit that cools the warm air as it blows over it to create a comfortable indoor temperature.

As hot air blows over the coil, condensation starts to form. Imagine water droplets forming on a cold glass of water, and that’s exactly what’s happening to your evaporator coil.

As the moisture forms, it drips into a drain pan that leads to a condensate drain line. This line leads out of your home so ideally, you shouldn’t have issues with your AC leaking inside the home.

Unfortunately, there may be times when your air conditioner is leaking water inside the house, but there’s no need to panic. Let’s examine a few reasons why this could be happening and how to fix it.

Why Your Air Conditioner is Leaking Water: A Clogged Drain Line

If your AC is leaking inside the home, it’s most likely due to a clogged condensate drain line. Over time, this line can become clogged with debris like dirt, dust, or mold.

When your condensate drain line gets clogged, water can’t escape and drain to the outside of the home. The line becomes backed up, causing the condensation to come back inside and leak water into your home.

One easy way to unclog the drain line is to remove the debris using a wet/dry vac. This should remove anything that’s causing it to be backed up, freeing the line to allow water to escape once again.

If the wet/dry vac method doesn’t work you may need to call the professionals for help. They have access to a special, powerful vacuum that can remove the blockage and free up the drain line.

Dirty Air Filter

You already know that you should change the air filter for your air conditioner every 30 days. A dirty air filter can make your system work harder, resulting in possible damage or worn-out parts.

In addition to causing strain on your home’s HVAC system, a dirty filter can block the flow of air that moves over the unit’s evaporator coil. When the air is blocked, the coil becomes extremely cold and can start to freeze.

As the frozen coil melts, the excess water can cause your pain to overflow. Keep a close eye on your air filter and change it every month or two. If the filter looks to be extremely dirty or clogged, it could be the reason why your air conditioner is leaking water inside the house.

Your AC is Low on Refrigerant

As the volume of refrigerant gets lower, the pressure inside of your AC system lowers, too. This can also cause your evaporator coil to freeze, creating a wet mess.

If you notice that your air conditioner isn’t cooling down your home like it should, check the refrigerant levels. Other signs include an unusual hissing or bubbling sound, which can indicate that you have a leak.

If you catch a leak in time, you might be able to repair the damage. If not, you could end up having to pay for a completely new unit.

Have your HVAC system inspected regularly to prevent these problems from occurring. Ideally, you should have a thorough inspection at the start of every summer to prevent leaks and other issues.

Other Reasons for AC Leaks

There may be a few other reasons why you notice that your air conditioner is leaking water inside your home. If your air conditioning system is older, you could have a rusted or damaged drain pan.

AC units that are between 12 and 15 years old may need a new pan. Try replacing an old, rusty drain pan and see if this remedies the issue.

Another potential cause of a leaking AC could be a broken condensate pump. If the unit is installed in the basement, the pump should be pumping water outside.

If your pump is broken, water can’t be pumped outside of the home any longer. It’s crucial to have this part either repaired or replaced as soon as possible to prevent water damage to your home.

Whenever you’re in doubt, it’s always best to turn to the professionals for help. Leaking air conditioners that go ignored can go from an annoying drip to a potential flood in a matter of days or weeks. Always get the problem checked out if you can’t pinpoint the source of the problem.

Say Goodbye to a Leaking AC

If you know what to look for when your air conditioner is leaking water, you might be able to get the problem fixed yourself. If you’re not sure why the leaks are happening, contact the pros to help.

With the right diagnosis, it’s easy to fix most air conditioner leaks before they get out of hand. In most cases, you can remedy the issue and continue to enjoy a cool, leak-free home all summer.

For more information on our services and how we can help if you’re in the Northern California area, visit Service Champions or contact us today.

Wall with mold stain due to air conditioner leakage, close up. Mildew destroys the wall.

The hot months of a Northern California summer mean that your air conditioner is likely working overtime.

If your air conditioner is leaking water, you may wonder why that’s happening and what you can do about it.

Read on to discover a few reasons why you may be dealing with an AC leaking and steps you can take to correct the issue.

How and Why Water Forms in Your Air Conditioner

Most modern air conditioning systems contain an indoor and outdoor unit. An evaporator coil is contained in the inside unit that cools the warm air as it blows over it to create a comfortable indoor temperature.

As hot air blows over the coil, condensation starts to form. Imagine water droplets forming on a cold glass of water, and that’s exactly what’s happening to your evaporator coil.

As the moisture forms, it drips into a drain pan that leads to a condensate drain line. This line leads out of your home so ideally, you shouldn’t have issues with your AC leaking inside the home.

Unfortunately, there may be times when your air conditioner is leaking water inside the house, but there’s no need to panic. Let’s examine a few reasons why this could be happening and how to fix it.

Why Your Air Conditioner is Leaking Water: A Clogged Drain Line

If your AC is leaking inside the home, it’s most likely due to a clogged condensate drain line. Over time, this line can become clogged with debris like dirt, dust, or mold.

When your condensate drain line gets clogged, water can’t escape and drain to the outside of the home. The line becomes backed up, causing the condensation to come back inside and leak water into your home.

One easy way to unclog the drain line is to remove the debris using a wet/dry vac. This should remove anything that’s causing it to be backed up, freeing the line to allow water to escape once again.

If the wet/dry vac method doesn’t work you may need to call the professionals for help. They have access to a special, powerful vacuum that can remove the blockage and free up the drain line.

Dirty Air Filter

You already know that you should change the air filter for your air conditioner every 30 days. A dirty air filter can make your system work harder, resulting in possible damage or worn-out parts.

In addition to causing strain on your home’s HVAC system, a dirty filter can block the flow of air that moves over the unit’s evaporator coil. When the air is blocked, the coil becomes extremely cold and can start to freeze.

As the frozen coil melts, the excess water can cause your pain to overflow. Keep a close eye on your air filter and change it every month or two. If the filter looks to be extremely dirty or clogged, it could be the reason why your air conditioner is leaking water inside the house.

Your AC is Low on Refrigerant

As the volume of refrigerant gets lower, the pressure inside of your AC system lowers, too. This can also cause your evaporator coil to freeze, creating a wet mess.

If you notice that your air conditioner isn’t cooling down your home like it should, check the refrigerant levels. Other signs include an unusual hissing or bubbling sound, which can indicate that you have a leak.

If you catch a leak in time, you might be able to repair the damage. If not, you could end up having to pay for a completely new unit.

Have your HVAC system inspected regularly to prevent these problems from occurring. Ideally, you should have a thorough inspection at the start of every summer to prevent leaks and other issues.

Other Reasons for AC Leaks

There may be a few other reasons why you notice that your air conditioner is leaking water inside your home. If your air conditioning system is older, you could have a rusted or damaged drain pan.

AC units that are between 12 and 15 years old may need a new pan. Try replacing an old, rusty drain pan and see if this remedies the issue.

Another potential cause of a leaking AC could be a broken condensate pump. If the unit is installed in the basement, the pump should be pumping water outside.

If your pump is broken, water can’t be pumped outside of the home any longer. It’s crucial to have this part either repaired or replaced as soon as possible to prevent water damage to your home.

Whenever you’re in doubt, it’s always best to turn to the professionals for help. Leaking air conditioners that go ignored can go from an annoying drip to a potential flood in a matter of days or weeks. Always get the problem checked out if you can’t pinpoint the source of the problem.

Say Goodbye to a Leaking AC

If you know what to look for when your air conditioner is leaking water, you might be able to get the problem fixed yourself. If you’re not sure why the leaks are happening, contact the pros to help.

With the right diagnosis, it’s easy to fix most air conditioner leaks before they get out of hand. In most cases, you can remedy the issue and continue to enjoy a cool, leak-free home all summer.

For more information on our services and how we can help if you’re in the Northern California area, visit Service Champions or contact us today.